Tag Archives: advertising

Advertising Research: The Loneliest Profession

1-Ndk8mEHCYlHzXjc5aq0gnw


Sure, it’s unlikely Don Draper could land an agency job today. Still, advertising is a practitioner-oriented field, and this has held true since the Mad Men era… but it’s the distance between university halls vs. the avenues of New York is our primary concern.

Enter the advertising researcher (and a bit of shameless self-promotion). Not to invite myself to the party, but my point is we brought cake. There’s untapped potential for bringing together the different perspectives of academic and creative by putting consumers at the center of the equation. And it’s us nerds who can help make it happen. (Read full article on Medium.com)

I write about advertising and culture from the POV of an advertising analyst for the I Love Charts collection on Medium. More at languageofbrands.tumblr.com


New Article: Advertising & Art

Language of brands_Jason Potteiger

Warhol Was Wrong About Advertising & Art:

“Huh, so you make lies for a living?” That was the first question he asked me. It was also the first time I’d told anyone I worked in advertising. I thumbed the glass of whiskey in front of me. Having landed my first internship earlier that day, at just 21 years old it was a bigger question than I realized at the time. It was a question about culture.

Commercial messages and manufactured iconography swirl with, around, between us. Thousands of brands occupy the collective consciousness and command a piece of the cultural pie. This is a story about how, and why… (keep reading on medium.com)

I recently started writing a weekly column for the I Love Charts collection on Medium. Each week I use charts (and hopefully wit) to explore the synthetic side of culture.

I’m very much looking forward to unpacking some big ideas about advertising and culture. There’s a lot to hate about advertising, but  there’s a lot to love, too–it’s just harder to find sometimes. Whether you play for Ad Busters or Ad Week, the reality is it’s there and it’s shaping us and our world.


Clean & Clear Campaign ‘See the Real Me’

It was a privilege work on this campaign for Clean & Clear, especially because it proves that advertising to women (and especially teenage girls) doesn’t require that brands make them feel ugly. In the insights phase of development we explored ways to engage with girls that was more positive and forward thinking than: you have a zit now use our product to “fix your face”. The heart of the campaign is about encouraging girls not be afraid of embracing their authentic selves and show the world their face (i.e., who they really are). Conceptually, we might sum up the approach as Dove’s “Real Beauty” meets  Nike’s “Just Do It”. In the execution DDB NY has done a great job blazing a new trail and J&J should be commended for their efforts to break the mold.

…Jeff B. Smith, president of United States skin care at Johnson & Johnson Consumer Companies, said Clean & Clear, which is aimed at females from 12 to 24, is shifting the way it talks about confidence to reflect how social networks challenge self-image.

“There is an interesting dynamic with teen girls today that we call the paradox,” Mr. Smith said. “They live in the world of social media and are very much out there and want to be seen, but they’re afraid of being judged.

…Jen Drexler, senior vice president of the Insight Strategy Group and co-author of “What She’s Not Telling You,” reviewed the campaign and praised the casting of nonactors in both the commercials and videos.

“Those girls look like my teenage babysitters who show up on a Saturday night,” Ms. Drexler said. “Clean & Clear has a very authentic and honest place that it’s coming from, and here they feel very much on the side of teenage girls.

(via nytimes.com)